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notes. tomorrow night, a conversation with geoffrey canada and david guggenheim. then later in the week, james ellroy, and robert reich would join us with seal. we also will have nancy brinker. tonight, we kick off the week with harold for junior. the former tennessee congressman is now the chairman of the democratic leadership council, dlc, and and he has a new book, "more davids than goliaths." >> everyone should see that. what guggenheim and canada have done, it is inspiring. i hope people see it. >> it is a moving film. one thing i am sure that geoffrey and davis and i i am sure will talk about is that it is anti-union. what do you make of that? >> whether we are finding greater success in one model or the other. i think probably one of the most poignant thing that has been said is it seems our education system that of to benefit adults where it should be squarely and comprehensively how to fix kid'' problems and how to answer the challenges they faced a today, so i love the debates. i am a charter school guy. i am not an anti-union guy. geoffrey, we should scale up what he is doing
from their pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: geoffrey canada is the ceo of the harlem tilden's zone. he is at the center of a wonderful new project from davis guggenheim called "waiting for superman." the film is a look at the state of public education in this country. >> one of the saddest days of my life was when my mother told me superman did not exist. i was a comic book readers. i read comic books. i love them. even in the death of the ghetto, you just thought -- in the depths of again, you just thought he would show up and he saves all the good people. maybe i was in the fourth grade. my mom said, superman is not real. what do you mean he is not? no, he is not real. she thought i was crying because i thought santa claus was not real. i cried because no one was coming with enough power to save us. kids look at the world and the make certain predictions based on the evidence they are receiving from their peers, from their parents, and from their teachers. from their perspective, the world as a heartless, coldblooded place because, from their side, the
. we are miles off of the western shore of canada's hudson bay, an area very inaccessible. there are no roads, but there are people who live along that shore. an enormous barge is carrying construction materials. it is the only way of getting that equipment there as part of a vital supply line. the conditions were fine, but this journey may not have been possible. as the earth warms up and polar ice melts, shipping lanes are becoming accessible for a longer in the year and for bigger vessels. that could mean the north west -- for longer in the year and for bigger vessels. this means the northwest could become an important shipping route, which could be streamy valuable. -- could be extremely valuable. the military health and exercise in arctic waters, a show of strength, and the government has committed to investing more in ships to patrol the area. other countries' dispute what canada is saying. they say the northwest passage should be free to shipping. there are some disagreements. it has a sense of the gold rush about it. remote areas like this are coming under scrutiny
deposits of oil and gas. both russia and canada say is theirs. a large part that has been under discussion. >> global climate change is transforming the arctic. the polar ice caps shrinking as temperatures rise. already, energy companies are moving in, sensing a massive opportunity as the area opens up for commercial exploitation. it is thought the arctic region may contain vast reserves of oil and gas. that is leading to the growing competition between the countries which surround it. today, the foreign ministers of russia and canada discussed their competing claims to take control of a large part of the arctic, including the north pole. their claims will eventually be judged by international experts. >> both russia and canada respect the united nations as well as the united nations convention on the law of the seas, and we will submit our data, and we are confident that our case will prevail, backed by scientific evidence. >> but the russians are already concerned that nato military forces could be sent to the arctic to protect western interests. >> we do not see, frankly speaking, any b
the economy and create jobs. what does he need to do? >> i say emulate canada. canada has cut its government spending. its corporate tax rate is now down to 18%. ours is 35%. by the way, canada shrunk the size of its government, and it has an 8. unemployment rate, and we have 9.5. they're winning. >> susie: you would like to see some movement on taxes. >> absolutely. >> susie: we're going to have to leave it there, brian. thanks a lot. have a great weekend. >> you, too, susie. >> susie: we've been speak with brian wesburg, chief economist. >> tom: september is a good month to remember, so far. let's get to tonight's "market focus." the major indices have been climbing since the month began on wednesday, closing close to three-week highs. the dow gained almost 3% this week, with buying continuing since the big rally wednesday. the nasdaq was up 3.7% over the past five sessions, and the s&p 500 added 3.8% this week, ending with the best three-day rally since may. stocks today were able to build on the buying, with financial stocks leading the way. the financial select e.t.f. includes banks, in
's going, this expansion will continue. china very the third-largest market for american goods after canada and mexico china has overtaken japan. so these are just incredible. and... incredible developments. >> rose: how many countries is china the largest market for? for example, i think china is the largest market for brazil, right? >> yes, yes. >> rose: a number of countries like that. >> that's right. >> rose: who've bj become a huge market. and the faster you can grow your middle-class-- which is the reason you put such an emphasis on economic growth-- the faster you can grow into the middle-class, the more demand you create, the more you will add to the market and it's... chinese leadership's attitude, it will provide a place that chinese companies can sell to beyond their dependence on foreign markets. >> yes. and if i may say so it's estimated they're about 300 million people who are becoming middle-class. it's a huge group of middle-class people. >> it's the largest move out of poverty on the part of any experience in the history of civilization. >> that's right. and china is going
the company's imports from canada. the pipeline is a primary supplier of crude oil from western united states into the canada. they expect "significant impact" on oil producers and refiners. it rose 3% to $76.45 a barrel in new york trading. >> tom: politics can make investors nervous, but not tonight's "market monitor." robert drach is the publisher of the "drach weekly research report." and he's is back with here on "nightly business report." >> good to see you, tom. >> tom: ahead of the november elections, you say you're absolutely bullish about stocks. why is that? >> if there was any time you didn't have to worry about the market than elections, this is it. historically, if the legislative and executive branches offset, which looks like is going to happen. >> tom: different parties. >> yeah. they offset, it is invariably strong for stocks. one group with a lot of the political cronyism, and special if you have another things. >> tom: like what? >> the most accommodated fed in history, and the cash reserves are the largest in history. >> tom: in terms of the corporate cash -- >> right. yo
in one of his campaigns, from new hampshire to canada. that really resonated with me. it was a touching, motivating story. there is one by a brain surgeon. he was in emigrant migrant worker, who came over from mexico, and he was a boxer. he really started, not even speaking english, pulling weeds. 10 years later, he was in medical school. if you could imagine that. his message was never quit, and how going from failure to failure is sometimes part of success. i really enjoyed that. interesting way of looking at it, but sometimes you don't always get where you want to go, but it does not mean you are not getting their. -- getting there. tavis: how has your relationship with your father -- when you came on the scene, we got to know your dad first. he introduced us to his girls. how has your relationship with your father changed over the years? he came out first, introduced us to you all, now you all are out front and you really see your father. how has the relationship changed over the years as you have moved out front? >> well, he has gone to some money matches and practices, -- he has g
of daniel or donald. they have an accent over the o. i was born in canada, but we went back to ireland and got green cards and came here. my sister siobahn plays my schizophrenic sister on the show. tavis: it is a family show. >> it was interesting for me because i take acting seriously but do not like to talk about it that way. i do not like to look indulgent. i have my thing i do, but do not prince around and talk about it much. the first time doing things with my sister -- i was so overcome with emotion i could not -- i could not get to scenes. this is kind of a thrilling thing when you are taken by something. it is artifice. you know how the scene starts and ends. when people always say, "i do not know where i went. it is so real," it is real in that it provoked a response when you watched it, but you knew where you were going. it was thrilling because there were moments where we really felt like we were flying, in a way. hopefully, if that resonated with us that way, all you can hope is people feel the same way when they watch it. tavis: apparently, they will. the critics like it.
silver and gold. it started in canada. this is a big picture play. i think gold is going. if we get a pullback in october in gold, i would buy that. >> tom: in 20 second, you like i.a.u., one of the gold e.t.f.s that hold the precious metal. do you trade it or hold on to it? >> it could be both. what i like, versus the g.l.d., which so many people talk about, which is $120 stock, this mirrors the price of gold and the $12 stock. it is something the average investor can buy, and still buying quality and don't have to commit as much capital. >> tom: how about disclosures for what we mentioned here tonight? >> i own and trade all of them. >> tom: it is mark leibovit, chief market strategist at >> tom: that's "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. i'm tom hudson. goodnight everyone and have a great weekend. you too, susie. >> susie: good night tom. i'm susie gharib have a good weekend everyone. we hope to see all of you again monday night. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you
values , modern values. look at the u.k. commonwealth from canada to subcontinent, u.k. is having good relationship. turkey is also the kind of political advantages we have been using this... i think this should be seen quite normally. france, spain. spain's relation to latin america, very special agreement. >> rose: so you're saying that the relationship you can have with the cross section of people within the islamic community and otherwise? president assad in an interview with me that was widely e quoted when i asked "what is your fear?" and he said "making sure syria remains a secular state." do you have that fear at all about you are the economy? >> there's not any question, any debate on if turkey should be secular or not secular. there's a consensus on this use it's not a question that turkish not be a secular state. secularism means the fundamental part of the constitution. no one wants to change this. religious freedom for all the religion is different. but state and religion should be separated if they are unhappy with this. >> rose: what, then, worries you the most about the
. the largest quantities come from india, china and canada. while these ingredients are produced in fact reas overseas that are approved by the f.d.a. , they rarely get inspected by federal regulators. allan coukell , a pharmacist and director of the medical safety program at the pew health group says in the last decade, the number of plants in india and china making ingredients for the american market has doubled at a time when f.d.a. has fewer resources to inspect them. >> if you're manufacturing overseas, you might never see an inspector after the initial inspection at the beginning of your manufacturing process. when inspections do go on overseas, they tend to be much short than domestic inspections. they're generally preannounced-- meaning the manufacturer has time to prepare ,-- and if problems are identified, the agency is much less able to go back subsequently and follow up to see whether the problems were adequately corrected. >> reporter: in 2008, 81 people died in the u.s. after being given the blood thinner heparin. ingredients for its manufacture came from china. heparin is made
evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. geoffrey canada is the president
south america and north america -- canada, mexico and the u.s. >> charlie: organization of american states. >> uniso should not replace the organization of american states. you are americans and we too are americans. >> charlie: do you worry about mexico as a failed state? >> i have a lot of trust in mexico. >> charlie: in the capacity to deal with this level of violence from non-state -- level of violence from non-state actors? >> when they decided to start this huge war against drugs, and always that war is very painful and costs a lot of lives, but i hope that at the end of the day they will succeed, because otherwise, if you don't, i think that terrorism and narcotraffic are very cruel and powerful enemies, and you have to fight them with all the instruments of your democratic system and your state of law. >> charlie: fed by two things. both demand and supply. >> yes, and they have -- they have -- the united states right on the borders, and the main demand for drugs comes from the u.s. so that's another problem. >> charlie: that's our problem to deal with. >> it's your problem a
to hull, massachusetts, including the islands of martha's vineyard and nantucket. in canada, parts of nova scotia were also under a hurricane watch. across long island, new york, the red cross readied shelters for the storm's arrival there, expected by tomorrow night. >> there are 25 shelters in each county, for a total of 50. the amount of capacity is an ample number of people. it is well in excess of 10,000 to 15,000 people that can be supported by those shelters. >> lehrer: for those who did stay to ride out earl, walks along windy beaches would have to do. officials imposed swimming bans up and down the coast, as conditions worsened during the day. and for the latest, ed rappaport, the deputy director of the national hurricane center in miami. i spoke with him a short time ago. mr. rappaport, welcome. >> good evening. >> lehrer: good evening. what's the latest on the storm as we speak, sir? >> at this hour, hurricane earl is centered about 200 miles to the south of the north carolina outer banks and it remains a considerable threat. it's still considered a major hurricane that's catego
. they apply at the u.n. refuse awe gee agency. the u.s., australia, canada and europe are top destinations although the economic slowdown has limited job prospects for newcomers. about 20,000 refugees were resettled last year. for most the wait can take years. iraq's religious minorities, mostly christians, and female- headed households receive priority. at the other end in a seemingly indefinite limbo are young men. they struggle on the margins in amman. this man pays his rent by fixing computers. he started a website to bring young iraqi exiles together and to help them navigate the asylum process. >> it's the most miserable situation for the young iraqis here in jordan. usually they can't find work here. there's not even work for jordanian nationals let alone young men who come here as refugees. you can't get a work permit. if you want to get a job it will be illegal. you could submit yourself to forced deportation if they find out. >> reporter: aide workers worry about the emerging generation. many have seen their education disrupted, further handicapping them in any job market. and th
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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